2180 E. 4500 S. Suite 245
SLC UT 84117

The mission of Interface is to provide quality emotional healthcare services to individuals, couples, families, and businesses. We believe emotional health is the cornerstone of a satisfying and successful life.

Symptoms

Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Syndrome:
National Institute of Mental Health

Impulsiveness:

  • a child who acts quickly without thinking first.

Hyperactivity:

  • a child who can’t sit still, walks, runs, or climbs around when others are seated, talks when others are not talking.

Inattention:

  • a child who daydreams or seems to be in another world, is sidetracked by what is going on around him or her.


Anxiety Disorders:

National Institute of Mental Health

There are several types of anxiety disorders. The most common are:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • People with generalized anxiety disorder can’t seem to shake their concerns. Their worries are accompanied by physical symptoms, especially fatigue, headaches, muscle tension, muscle aches, difficulty swallowing, trembling, twitching, irritability, sweating, and hot flashes.

Social Anxiety

  • People with social phobia has a persistent, intense, and chronic fear of being watched and judged by others and being embarrassed or humiliated by their own actions. Their fear may be so severe that it interferes with work or school, and other ordinary activities. Physical symptoms often accompany the intense anxiety of social phobia and include blushing, profuse sweating, trembling, nausea, and difficulty talking.

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

  • People with PTSD have persistent frightening thoughts and memories of their ordeal and feel emotionally numb, especially with people they were once close to. They may experience sleep problems, feel detached or numb, or be easily startled.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  • People with OCD may be plagued by persistent, unwelcome thoughts or images, or by the urgent need to engage in certain rituals. They may be obsessed with germs or dirt, and wash their hands over and over. They may be filled with doubt and feel the need to check things repeatedly.

Panic Disorder

  • People with panic disorder have feelings of terror that strike suddenly and repeatedly with no warning. During a panic attack, most likely your heart will pound and you may feel sweaty, weak, faint, or dizzy. Your hands may tingle or feel numb, and you might feel flushed or chilled. You may have nausea, chest pain or smothering sensations, a sense of unreality, or fear of impending doom or loss of control.


Bipolar Disorder:
National Institute of Mental Health

Bipolar disorder causes dramatic mood swings from overly “high” and/or irritable to sad and hopeless, and then back again, often with periods of normal mood in between. Sever changes in energy and behavior go along with these changes in mood. The periods of highs and lows are called episodes of mania and depression.

Depression:
National Institute of Mental Health

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed


Substance Abuse / Dependence

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV

DSM-IV Substance Abuse Criteria

Substance dependence is defined as a maladaptive pattern of substance use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress or manifested by one (or more) of the following, occurring within a 12-month period:

  1. Recurrent substance use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home (such as repeated absences or poor work performance related to substance use; substance-related absences, suspensions, or expulsions from school; or neglect of children or household).
  2. Recurrent substance use in situations in which it is physically hazardous (such as driving an automobile or operating a machine when impaired by substance use)
  3. Recurrent substance-related legal problems (such as arrests for substance related disorderly conduct)
  4. Continued substance use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of the substance (for example, arguments with spouse about consequences of intoxication and physical fights.)

Alternatively, the symptoms have never met the criteria for substance dependence for this class of substance.

DSM-IV Substance Dependence Criteria

Addiction (termed substance dependence by the American Psychiatric Association) is defined as a maladaptive pattern of substance use leading to clinically significant impairment of distress, as manifested by three (or more) of the following, occurring any time in the same 12-month period:

  1. Tolerance, as defined by either of the following: A need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or the desired effect or markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same mount of the substance.
  2. Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following: (a) The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for the substance or (b) The same (or closely related) substance is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.
  3. The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than intended.
  4. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control substance use.
  5. A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the substance, use the substance, or recover from its effects.
  6. Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of substance use.
  7. The substance use is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by the substance (for example, current cocaine use